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Technology group makes largest-ever in-kind contribution to NMSU

The largest in-kind corporate contribution ever received by New Mexico State University - computer software systems, equipment and training with an in-kind commercial value of $112.7 million - was announced today by Partners for the Advancement of Collaborative Engineering Education (PACE).



Robert Kruse, left, executive director of vehicle integration and performance for General Motors, talks with Jan Martin, wife of NMSU President Michael Martin, and NMSU Dean of Engineering Steven Castillo following the announcement of the largest in-kind

PACE is a joint philanthropic initiative of General Motors, EDS, Sun Microsystems and UGS Corp. that has worked together since 1999 to support key academic institutions worldwide with computer-based engineering tools to prepare mechanical designers, engineers, and analysts with the skills to compete in the future.

The PACE in-kind contribution will enhance NMSU's engineering programs and help prepare students for careers in vehicle design, engineering and manufacturing, as well as other fields.


"Our students will be using the same computer-aided design and engineering systems used by General Motors and other leading industries, and our graduates will be prepared to hit the ground running," said NMSU Dean of Engineering Steven Castillo. "This will be a tremendous advantage to our students and to the companies that need a highly skilled and trained work force."

The PACE software, including UGS' NX?, Teamcenter® Engineering, and Tecnomatix, will be used primarily by engineering students and faculty. These powerful modeling and simulation tools will allow students to design projects ranging from more efficient factories to simulated automobile crash tests to the flow of blood through artificial heart valves.

Additional software and training provided by the PACE contribution includes Altair® Hyperworks®, FLUENT®, MSC.Adams and MSC.Nastran from MSC.Software. Computer workstations from EDS refurbished by Hewlett Packard were also contributed through PACE.


With the addition of New Mexico State University, the PACE collaboration now includes 35 strategically selected universities around the world, including MIT, Virginia Tech, the University of Michigan and Georgia Tech.

"We are proud to be a part of this elite group of institutions and we are excited about the opportunities that this generous in-kind contribution will create for our faculty and students," said NMSU President Michael Martin. "This collaboration combines the university's strengths in engineering education with the resources and know-how of some of world's leading technology companies."

For General Motors, the initiative is an investment in the company's future.

"The definition of what an engineer does is changing," said Robert Kruse, GM's executive director for vehicle integration and performance. "Being proficient with the latest computer-based design tools opens up new career opportunities throughout the engineering world. That's why the PACE program and institutions like New Mexico State are so important. Our common goal is to help train engineers to succeed in the rapidly evolving engineering environment of the future."

Todd Taylor, client executive for EDS GM Global Product Development, agreed.

"PACE offers a unique combination of hardware and software to facilitate the learning of computer-aided design and engineering concepts," Taylor said. "Students gain valuable experience applying these concepts as they work on industry projects. NMSU graduates will be highly skilled, knowledgeable and ready to work in this exciting field."

Sun Microsystems' Daniel Wecker, director, Global Automotive Industry, said his company is "proud to help the premier institutions of higher learning such as New Mexico State University access the tools and technologies their students need to develop their product design and engineering talents."

"While increasingly playing an instrumental role to breaking down barriers, which enable institutions to make educational materials accessible to a diverse student population, technology is propelling us into what we call the Participation Age," Wecker added. "In the Participation Age, the network is a platform and students and educators from all over the globe can interact and share knowledge and ideas. In short, it's about engaging, empowering, and extending the impact each participant can make."

UGS Corp. "is pleased to be involved with such a superior university," said Donald Cooper, director of sales for UGS' South Central Region. "NMSU students will be able to use the same software that is used by some of the finest manufacturers in the world."

For more information about the NMSU-PACE announcement, go to http://www.pacepartners.org/press_nmsu.html.

For more information about PACE, visit http://www.pacepartners.org.

First photo is available at
http://ucommphoto.nmsu.edu/newsphoto/gm_demo.jpg
CUTLINE: Engineering student Brian Clason checks out a Cadillac convertible at the
"GM Drive Experience" that followed the announcement of the largest in-kind corporate contribution ever received by New Mexico State University. Partners for the Advancement of Collaborative Engineering Education (PACE), which includes General Motors, EDS, Sun Microsystems and UGS Corp., contributed computer software systems, equipment and training with an in-kind commercial value of $112.7 million. (NMSU photo by J. Victor Espinoza)

Second photo is available at
http://ucommphoto.nmsu.edu/newsphoto/gm_pace_lab.jpg
CUTLINE: Satish Kondapally, a graduate student in mechanical engineering, demonstrates his design for a mini-baja vehicle created with computer-assisted design technology contributed to NMSU by Partners for the Advancement of Collaborative Engineering Education (PACE). (NMSU photo by J. Victor Espinoza)

Third photo is available at
http://ucommphoto.nmsu.edu/newsphoto/gm_announcement.jpg
CUTLINE: Robert Kruse, left, executive director of vehicle integration and performance for General Motors, talks with Jan Martin, wife of NMSU President Michael Martin, and NMSU Dean of Engineering Steven Castillo following the announcement of the largest in-kind corporate contribution ever received by NMSU. Partners for the Advancement of Collaborative Engineering Education (PACE), which includes GM, EDS, Sun Microsystems and UGS Corp., contributed computer software systems, equipment and training with an in-kind commercial value of $112.7 million. (NMSU photo by Darren Phillips)


Karl Hill
March 16, 2006