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NMSU College of Education selects Stan Fulton Chair

The New Mexico State University College of Education has selected Eric Lopez, Ph.D., as the Stan Fulton Chair for the Improvement of Border and Rural Schools.



Eric Lopez, an associate professor in New Mexico State University's College of Education, has been selected to serve as the Stan Fulton Chair for the Improvement of Border and Rural Schools. (NMSU photo by Darren Phillips)


The Stan Fulton Chair was established to enhance communication among NMSU faculty, staff and students and pre-kindergarten through 12th grade constituents to improve border and rural schools. In this capacity, the chair will expand, improve and coordinate existing outreach programs and research activities.

The chair was established in 2005 and is funded in part by an endowed gift from Stan Fulton, a benefactor to the university and owner of Sunland Park Racetrack and Casino.

"I am very honored and excited about the opportunity to help New Mexico's kids and their families," Lopez said.

Lopez will serve a three-year term and, at the dean's discretion, he may serve a second term.

Lopez is an associate professor of special education at NMSU. He received his bachelor's in history from Texas A&M University and his Ed.S. and Ph.D. in school psychology from the University of Iowa. Before coming to NMSU, Lopez was a practicing bilingual school psychologist with the Las Cruces Public Schools for three years, serving as the mental health team co-lead his last year.

At NMSU, he directs the educational diagnostician program, chairs the U.S. Border and Latino Studies Committee and teaches in the bilingual special education and school psychology programs. He is a nationally certified school psychologist and licensed educational diagnostician. He has served as the president of the New Mexico Association of School Psychologists and on the Certification Board for the National Association of School Psychologists.

Lopez's research has resulted in numerous publications in national and international journals as well as in grant funding totaling close to $300,000. His scholarship has impacted school psychology, a field where Latino authors rarely publish in influential journals and where studies focusing on Latino students are rarely conducted.

Lopez also has received the Patricia Christmore Teaching Award and the College of Education Excellence in Teaching Award. In 2005, he was recognized in Who's Who Among American Teachers and Who's Who in America.