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New Mexico State University

New Mexico State University

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NMSU students to learn about life and politics from Richardson and Carruthers

One hundred and forty New Mexico State University students will receive life lessons and political insights from two of New Mexico's leaders this fall.


ll Richardson and Garrey Carruthers, dean of NMSU's College of Business, will team teach the honors course "How New Mexico State Government Works: The Key Players and Key Issues" on Friday afternoons beginning Aug. 26.

"Our goal is to offer students a perspective on leadership and policy that they wouldn't get anywhere else," Richardson said.

"I've always enjoyed the classroom, and I'm excited for the opportunity to return," said Carruthers, a former governor of New Mexico.

The course will address the roles of the governor and the state Legislature, as well as the roles of federal and tribal governments, political parties and public opinion. The class also will examine key policy issues facing New Mexico, focusing on five significant policy areas: drilling in Otero Mesa; establishment of Native American casino in Anthony; economic development of New Mexico; drunken driving; and early childhood development. Students will be required to conduct an in-depth analysis of each issue, and provide a two- to three-page memorandum to Richardson that outlines specific recommendations and policy proposals.

"I am really excited to take a class taught by those involved in the political area," said Jenna Frosch, an NMSU honors student and a double major in journalism and government who is registered for the class. "They can give insight on how to be successful in a government job, which is eventually what I want to do. I expect to learn a lot about government through the firsthand experiences related to the class from these leaders."

"The Honors College is proud of its record in producing leaders in politics, science, the arts and other areas," said William Eamon, director of the Honors College. "So it makes sense for the two governors to share their knowledge and expertise with honors students. The honors enrollment allotment filled quickly; honors students are thrilled to have this opportunity."

There are about 65 honors students registered for the class.

Highlights of the course include appearances by the governors' cabinet; the New Mexico Legislature; members of city, county and tribal governments; advocacy groups; New Mexico's Congressional delegation; business leaders; lobbyists; and journalists.

"We would like for students to have an understanding and enthusiasm for public life," Carruthers said.