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New Mexico State University

New Mexico State University

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New Mexico State University teams up with free downloading service for students

The Housing and Residential Life office at New Mexico State University is teaming up with Ruckus Network Inc., a multimedia network that supplies free and legal downloading service to the college student market.


"What we liked about Ruckus was it was completely free to students," said Julie Weber, director of Housing and Residential Life for NMSU.

Ruckus has a library of almost three million tracks of virus-free music. While downloading is free, there will be a fee to burn CDs and a $20 cost per semester to download music to a MP3 player. Faculty and staff will pay a low fee of $8.99 a month for the service and alumni have the option to keep their account for a fee, Weber said.

She said it was important to offer this service to NMSU students because it is an amenity that many other schools around the country have, including Brown, Duke and the University of Denver. Also, it will help stop lawsuits from the Recording Industry Association of America.

"The RIAA are not shy about going after college students that illegally download file sharing," Weber said. "This offers students the option to do it legally."

Ruckus will be available to all NMSU students, but will work more effectively and efficiently for on-campus students who use high speed internet, Weber said.

Ruckus is not only free to students but is also a free service for the university. Ruckus was chosen because it met NMSU's standards of advertising, which pays for the service, and because NMSU uses high speed internet with less traffic. Also, Ruckus has met students' standards for music selection, she said.

"We wanted to make sure Ruckus was offering a large enough section of the type of music students would like," Weber said. "We had the Student Government for Campus Residents test the accounts and they were really enthusiastic about it."

Sarah Stoltzfus, SGCR president, said teaming up with Ruckus was a good decision by the university because it offers students the ability to download music for free without any threat of legal action.

"I'm really excited about Ruckus," Stoltzfus said. "It's really fun to use and it is nice to be able to listen to music and not have to pay for it."

She said that while some students may not want to download the Ruckus player to their computer, once they do, they will enjoy everything Ruckus has to offer.

To use Ruckus, students must first go to its Web site and create an account using their nmsu.edu e-mail address. The process only takes a few minutes. Then students must download the Ruckus player because no other player will work. Downloading from the Web site is quick.

Weber said users can create and share playlists and can also link them to facebook. Explicit songs are marked and can also be blocked if a user chooses to.

"I think its going to be fun for students," Weber said. "Our goal is to have it be a highly used amenity in the residential halls and we hope students get good use out of it."

For more information call (575) 646-4468 or visit www.ruckus.com.