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New Mexico State University

New Mexico State University

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Stock Market Game benefits students in understanding real world economy

To help students make strong and direct connections with the real world's economy, business and government, the Stock Market Game is used in classrooms from the fourth grade through college.


The game program, run by the Securities Industries and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA), is a live trading simulation in which students strive to create a high-performing portfolio based off the real marketplace. The students use internet research and real news updates to learn core academic concepts and skills that can help them succeed in the classroom and in life.

A recent study by Learning Points Associates has shown that students who have participated in the Stock Market Game perform better in mathematics and financial literacy than students who haven't. The study also asked teachers about how they implemented the game to fit their class room, and how the positive results were achieved regardless of how the game was played, either basic or advanced. This result suggests the game is easy to implement using standard teaching practices.

"We're hoping the results of the survey spark an interest for using the game among more math teachers," said Ken Martin, the program director for the Stock Market Game Program for the state New Mexico and professor of finance at New Mexico State University's College of Business.

During the 2008-2009 academic year 94 teachers in New Mexico used the game in 74 schools with a total of 4,224 students participating, Martin said. The game is also used at NMSU as a personal finance course.

"The game benefits the students by getting them to think about their financial future in a world of high marketing," Martin said. "It shows them to save and invest but also that the stock market is risky, and they must take precautions such as diversifying their investments. In New Mexico, success in the game is determined, not just by financial return, but also how much risk was involved in a portfolio."

For more information, contact Martin at (575) 646-1236.