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NMSU to host Ranchers Roundtable on reproduction, heifer development in Corona Feb. 15

New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center is continuing its popular Ranchers Roundtable series with a group discussion on reproduction and heifer development Feb. 15.


Group of people sitting at tables listening to panel of speakers.
NMSU's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center is continuing its Ranchers Roundtable series with a group discussion on reproduction and heifer development Feb. 15, starting at 9:30 a.m. The roundtable will be held at Corona Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability. (Submitted photo)

The free event is from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability. Lunch will be served.

"The goal of the Ranchers Roundtable is for people to come and have a conversation about different topics that are important to them," said Shad Cox, Corona ranch manager. "There is no lecture. Each speaker gives an introduction, but it is really the attendees who lead the program with the questions they need answered. The ranchers do not leave until they have all their questions answered."

Speakers who will be available to discuss various points of interest on reproduction and heifer development are Manny Encinias, Extension beef cattle specialist with NMSU; Kent Mills, a field nutritionist with Hi-Pro Feed; Tim Ross, NMSU reproductive physiologist; and Mike Nichols, a senior veterinarian with Pfizer Animal Health Veterinary Operations.

Eric Scholljegerdes, with NMSU's Department of Animal and Range Sciences, said they are taking advantage of the newly built Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability for the roundtable sessions.

"The premise of the Southwest Center for Rangeland Sustainability is to provide a venue to bring the community and experts within the state together for more intimate discussions on different subjects that are important to the agricultural community," said Scholljegerdes, who will also serve as moderator.

Each month a different roundtable discussion will be held to address upcoming management decisions and challenges. The roundtable format lends itself to a casual learning experience with attendees guiding the direction and level of information provided.

Each person in attendance has the opportunity to get the information pertinent to making timely decisions. Scholljegerdes said the different topics broached are discussed roughly three months in advance in order to give ranchers enough lead time to prepare, such as with the breeding season.

"I want every person who attends to know more when they leave than when they arrived," Scholljegerdes said. "I want ranchers to go home feeling confident that they can put knowledge gained at the roundtable into practice on their own ranch.

Cox said he has already received positive feedback from the attendees of the January session, along with topic ideas for future roundtables.

Other topics to be addressed throughout the year will include, but are not limited to: nutrition, poisonous plants, wildlife, computer applications, marketing, range management, ranch economics, taxes and brush control.

Scholljegerdes said as long as ranchers are interested in participating in a roundtable session, NMSU will continue to offer them.

Registration is not required to attend the sessions.

The February Ranchers Roundtable is sponsored by Hi-Pro Feeds in Friona, Texas.

For more information on the seminars, contact Cox at 575-849-1015 or visit http://corona.nmsu.edu/.