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New Mexico State University

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NMSU animal and range sciences faculty, students recognized at regional meeting

Faculty and graduate students at New Mexico State University's Department of Animal and Range Sciences won big at a recent Western Section, American Society of Animal Science meeting in Phoenix.


Woman next to brick wall
Shanna Lodge-Ivey, an associate professor, is only the second woman to receive the Young Scientist award from the Western Section, American Society of Animal Science since it was created in 1975. (Courtesy photo)
Group shot
Graduate students in the Department of Animal and Range Scientists were recognized at the recent Western Section, American Society of Animal Science meeting in Phoenix. From left: Connie Larson, who presented the Institutional Award as the representative from ZinPro, Inc.; Kelsey Quinn; Melanie Beckman; Patricia Black; Piedad Mayagoitia; and Travis Mulliniks. (Courtesy photo)

Shanna Lodge-Ivey, an associate professor, is only the second woman to receive the Young Scientist award from the society since it was created in 1975.

"I don't put a lot of emphasis on awards, but I was very glad to be recognized by my society," Lodge-Ivy said. "I have to give credit to my undergraduate and graduate students, as well as my research associate, Johnette Browne-Silva, who all help to get the work done. The list of past winners of the Young Scientist award reads like a Who's Who in the world of animal science and I am honored to be on that list."

Lodge-Ivey is an active grant writer, a co-investigator on a funded grant in calf health and involved in a multi-agency research group to evaluate algae as sources of biofuels. Her portion of the research is to investigate the use of algal by product from aviation fuel. She has published 69 journal articles, proceeding papers and abstracts, and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Animal Science.

Lodge-Ivey teaches courses in animal nutrition, animal metabolism and rumen microbiology. She is an active member of several professional organizations, university and departmental committees, as well as acting as a mentor and adviser to undergraduate and graduate students.

"This recognition will continue to drive me to work hard and produce strong science and well-trained students," Lodge-Ivey said. "I will not be resting on my laurels anytime soon. We have some really cool research projects gearing up for the fall semester."

Graduate students were also recognized for their work at the meeting. Melanie Beckman, a master's student working with Lodge-Ivey, earned first place in the graduate student paper competition for her paper, "Digestibility of algal biofuel co-product in a forage diet."

Kelsey Quinn placed second for her presentation, "Fetal and maternal induction of angiogenic factors during early pregnancy." She was also elected the Western section, American Society of Animal Science graduate student representative to the American Society of Animal Science Executive Board.

Travis Mulliniks received first-place honors in the applied animal science manuscript competition for his paper, "Metabolizable protein supply alters pregnancy and subsequent retention rate during heifer development while grazing dormant winter forage."

NMSU also received the institution graduate student paper competition award.

The NMSU Animal and Range Sciences Graduate Student Association placed second in the first-ever American Society of Animal Science Video Competition for its video, "How NMSU Animal and Range Sciences Department is Feeding the World."

Tim Ross, interim department head, said the faculty and students in the Department of Animal and Range Sciences strive for excellence.

"This reputation allows NMSU to attract outstanding faculty and graduate students," Ross said. "We emphasis 'good science,' from the initiation of an experiment until it is presented and published. This is why our graduate students are so successful at professional meetings. The key is strong mentoring by faculty in our department, such as Dr. Shanna Ivey. Someone once said, 'People will rise to a level of expectation.' Our department sets that level high."