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Halliburton donation funds training for engineers

New Mexico State University engineering students are getting some practice in skills that will complement their technical abilities this summer, thanks to a $15,000 donation from Halliburton for the Halliburton Global Scholars Program.


Four NMSU engineering students work on a project using Legos.
New Mexico State University engineering students participate in a team-building project during a Halliburton Global Scholars Program workshop at NMSU. (NMSU photo by Emily C. Kelley)
Four NMSU engineering students work on a project using Legos.
New Mexico State University engineering students participate in a team-building project during a Halliburton Global Scholars Program workshop at NMSU. (NMSU photo by Emily C. Kelley)

The Halliburton Global Scholars Program focuses on topics and skills such as teamwork, resume and portfolio development, project management, financial management and intellectual property issues - important topics for those preparing to enter the professional world.

"These workshops teach transferability of academic knowledge into a real world setting," said Patricia Sullivan, College of Engineering assistant dean. "Students need to be well-prepared to enter the workforce, and skills like concisely displaying or presenting their work can be quite a door-opener."

During one of the Friday afternoon workshops, the students completed individual Jung Typology Tests to determine their personality types - whether they're introverts or extroverts, sensing or intuitive, thinking or feeling and judging or perceiving. When their four-letter personality types were determined, workshop leaders and engineering technology faculty members Anthony Hyde and Luke Nogales divided the group into teams, and the students discussed their personality types, then had to complete a project as a group, noting how their different personality types contributed to or detracted from the work.

Hyde, who has worked in both academia and consulting, told the students that their ability to work as part of a team would determine their success more than their technical abilities.

"It's good to see more what we need to improve on before we graduate," said Casey Campbell, NMSU mechanical engineering student.

"It is essential that students become more involved outside of their academic environment," Sullivan said. "Learning to work with a diverse team is key to success. This program gives our engineers a more well-rounded academic experience."